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    James Pate Ayo's Chair 2020 Charcoal 38 x 50 Courtesy of the Karlos Marshall collection "Although the medium I chose for the rendering is charcoal, the medium of the subject matter is wood. At its core this work is an interpersonal statement about hope, desire, and expectation. I generated this image after contemplating individuals and organizations that create places and spaces that nurture and advance the well-being of children. Their goodwill symbolizes the profound support that a child needs from a community and humanity at large. “Ayo’s Chair” is deliberately a masculine-driven opinion that points out the impact that adult males have on the development of young males. It is my hope that when my own son encounters role models of the village, he will be seen as a work in process in need of their positive energy and guidance. In addition to the support I provide, I desire for other male figures—in particular—to share their love and knowledge to increase his chances of one day becoming a distributor of love and knowledge as well. I expect for the members of our local and global community to refrain from sabotaging, undermining, or deliberately derailing his efforts toward self-improvement, community building, and prosperity. In this piece Ayo is representing every child as he reads a book while perched on a four-legged chair. Illustrated is a male representation carved into each leg of the chair. Together the figures lock arms to form a complete support system that can ensure a healthy outcome for the future. Composing this piece came with thoughts of an art production environment, where works of influence, persuasion, and seduction are brought to physical existences. As a summary for this piece, the shadows casting from the chair’s legs form the West African Adinkra symbol called Mframadan (x inside a square), which represents a structure built to withstand treacherous conditions."

    Willis "Bing" Davis Anti-Police Brutality Dance Mask #22 2021 Clay and Found Objects 64x18x4 Clay and Found Objects "This series began in 1999 and was conceived using the tradition of African mask making to draw attention to the age old problem of police brutality toward African Americans and other people of color in America. I propose that these contemporary mask images be displayed in buildings and rooms where people gather to discuss actions and solutions to police brutality and related issues."

    Derrick Davis Kente Spirit #135 2019 Prismacolor pencil 14 x 39 Courtesy of the artist The inspiration for my art comes from Kente cloth patterns associated with the Ewe and Asante people of Ghana. I use these patterns in a variety of ways, combined with geometric shapes and an array of colors.   The art is abstract in nature, however, there is a strong architectural influence in every piece I do.  If you combine abstract and architecture, you come up with “abstructure.” “Abstructure art”, I feel, is the best way to describe my work.

    Derrick Davis Kente Spirit #135 2019 Prismacolor pencil 14 x 39 Courtesy of the artist The inspiration for my art comes from Kente cloth patterns associated with the Ewe and Asante people of Ghana. I use these patterns in a variety of ways, combined with geometric shapes and an array of colors.   The art is abstract in nature, however, there is a strong architectural influence in every piece I do.  If you combine abstract and architecture, you come up with “abstructure.” “Abstructure art”, I feel, is the best way to describe my work.

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